A layman’s Quick Look at the FOXI3 Gene and its Mutation Causing Pattern Baldness in Dogs. part 2

Part Two: Common Phenotypes of the FOXI3 Hh combination.

I find the old books with pictures of the Xolo or alternatively, the Chinese Crested in which they look alike, to be fascinating. They lead me to speculate about their interconnections. They also had a wide range of hairiness on the Hh gene that is now ignored by all of the hairless AKC breed standards, which aspire to the ideal type. Nowadays you don’t see pictures of the Hh dogs in all their variations. If you see them at all, they are trimmed to resemble the Breed Club Standard’s ideal. When bred, these dogs too, express all kinds of Hh phenotypes including the ideal balance of pattern-baldness with enhanced hair, compared to the Xolo Phenotype, which just has wisps.

Cursory research into Chinese Cresteds has indicated that that there are at least 4 common coat phenotypes in those with the Hh gene. They start with the ones covered all over with a single coat. The second general phenotype is a pattern of baldness in some variation of an “H” pattern of hair on the otherwise naked body. This phenotype is the least favored one for looks. The third phenotype is the favored pattern of baldness in the Chinese Crested, a hairless body with a nice crest and sox and plumed tail tip. The fourth phenotype is the xolo baldness pattern- naked except for sparse hair on the head feet and tail tip.

There still appears to be a mystery about the range of expression of the Hh gene. there is a continuum from completely covered Hairy Hairless (HHL) to skimpy patches on the head, feet tail as preferred in the Xolo. The common phenotypes could be a series of alleles or another factor on the H part.  Each Hh pup gets these factors/alleles, which together, choose the degree and pattern of hairlessness.  A very easy to understand article on how alleles work here: http://www.hobart.k12.in.us/jkousen/Biology/multalle.htm

In the absence of formal knowledge on the increasing pattern baldness from scientists, I want to poke around with different ideas.  If I am wrong about something, I guess I’ll find out sooner or later and add to my knowledge.

5 Comments

Pearl Maven

Ruthie march 30, 2011. sorry it is blurry, but still good for showing her silhouette.

Reply

Pai

H-pattern hairies seem to appear in Peruvians as well (not sure about Xolos). The difference is, incorrect body hair was never tolerated in Xolo/PIO so those 'variants' are not seen in those breeds very often at all, unlike in Cresteds where the hairier types have been repeatedly bred on and increased in numbers.

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Pearl Maven

Thanks for reading this, Pai. I really enjoy the work you put in on posting the dog photos out of 100 year old books. You seem to be almost as good as the Google Spiders at ferreting out info on the hairless and other dogs. I thank you for your photos and links! I think I see interesting problems if I am correct about alleles for "make me more hairy" and "make me less hairy".

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El Xolototl

In the Mexican village xoloitzquintles, longer hair on hairless dogs is not usual. Short hair is the standard, so even in a incomplete hairless factor, the hair is short and often debilitated. The Chinese Crested hair comes from some other breeding added in.

Reply

Pai

@El — Yes, that's very clear when you look at the very earliest recorded accounts and images of Chinese Cresteds. The Xolo influence in them was very plain originally, but it has faded over time because those outcross genes for a longer coat/etc were selected to dominate over the decades.

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